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What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops.


This video clearly demonstrates how racist America is as a country and how far we have to go to become a country that is civilized and actually values equal justice. We must not rest until this goal is achieved. I do not want my great grandchildren to live in a country like we have today. I wish for them to live in a country where differences of race and culture are not ignored but valued as a part of what makes America great.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Lawsuit Charges U.S. Uses Secret, Unfounded ‘National Security Concerns’ to Deny Muslim Immigrants Citizenship https://www.aclu.org/national-security/lawsuit-charges-us-uses-secret-unfounded-national-security-concerns-deny-muslim

"LOS ANGELES – Five people who have lived in the United States legally for decades filed a lawsuit today challenging a little-known government program used to deny thousands of law-abiding people citizenship, green cards, and visas on counterterrorism grounds – most of them from Muslim-majority countries. Immigrants whose applications are denied under the program do not find out why or have a meaningful opportunity to respond, the same as people who find themselves in the government’s wider watchlist system.

The suit was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California, the national ACLU, and the law firms of Jones Day and Stacy Tolchin. It charges that the program violates immigration law, and is unconstitutional because it was adopted without any congressional approval and violates the Fifth Amendment’s guarantee of due process."

The Palestinian Wall on ABC News Nightline 1988

Rewrite: A new future for girls Lawrence O’Donnell looks at how First Lady Michelle Obama is rewriting the vision for girls and women around the globe.



The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell on msnbc

Rewrite: Noah’s Ark park | MSNBC



Rewrite: Noah’s Ark park | MSNBC

Yet Another Man With a Gun Just Murdered His Wife and Children | Mother Jones

"State police call it "one of the worst cases of domestic violence in Maine's history."

Monday, July 28, 2014

Georgia's deadly prisons | Cover Story | Creative Loafing Atlanta

On April 29, 2013, around 4:16 p.m., correctional officers entered Detravia Bryant's cell at Ware State Prison, a maximum-security facility just outside Waycross, a South Georgia town a short drive from the Okefenokee Swamp.
There they discovered the 29-year-old west Atlanta native lying on the floor. According to the handwritten incident report, the convicted murderer was not breathing and had no pulse. Quinten Mallery, his cellmate, was placed in restraints and taken to the showers. After staff attempted CPR, Bryant was transported by ambulance to a hospital in Waycross. One hour after prison staff first responded to Bryant's cell, he was pronounced dead.
Corrections officials categorized Bryant's death as a suicide, family members say. It would have been unlike Bryant to take his own life, says his great uncle James Jackson.


Georgia's deadly prisons | Cover Story | Creative Loafing Atlanta

Sunday, July 27, 2014

The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization - NYTimes.com

It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.
The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.
We reached that conclusion after a great deal of discussion among the members of The Times’s Editorial Board, inspired by a rapidly growing movement among the states to reform marijuana laws.
There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use. But neither are there such answers about tobacco or alcohol, and we believe that on every level — health effects, the impact on society and law-and-order issues — the balance falls squarely on the side of national legalization. That will put decisions on whether to allow recreational or medicinal production and use where it belongs — at the state level.
We considered whether it would be best for Washington to hold back while the states continued experimenting with legalizing medicinal uses of marijuana, reducing penalties, or even simply legalizing all use. Nearly three-quarters of the states have done one of these.
But that would leave their citizens vulnerable to the whims of whoever happens to be in the White House and chooses to enforce or not enforce the federal law.
The social costs of the marijuana laws are vast. There were 658,000 arrests for marijuana possession in 2012, according to F.B.I. figures, compared with 256,000 for cocaine, heroin and their derivatives. Even worse, the result is racist, falling disproportionately on young black men, ruining their lives and creating new generations of career criminals.
There is honest debate among scientists about the health effects of marijuana, but we believe that the evidence is overwhelming that addiction and dependence are relatively minor problems, especially compared with alcohol and tobacco. Moderate use of marijuana does not appear to pose a risk for otherwise healthy adults. Claims that marijuana is a gateway to more dangerous drugs are as fanciful as the “Reefer Madness” images of murder, rape and suicide.
There are legitimate concerns about marijuana on the development of adolescent brains. For that reason, we advocate the prohibition of sales to people under 21.
Creating systems for regulating manufacture, sale and marketing will be complex. But those problems are solvable, and would have long been dealt with had we as a nation not clung to the decision to make marijuana production and use a federal crime.
In coming days, we will publish articles by members of the Editorial Board and supplementary material that will examine these questions. We invite readers to offer their ideas, and we will report back on their responses, pro and con.
We recognize that this Congress is as unlikely to take action on marijuana as it has been on other big issues. But it is long past time to repeal this version of Prohibition.


The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization - NYTimes.com

Saturday, July 26, 2014

NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People

"It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City's income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.

Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex's 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance."

Warren taking cues from Obama’s playbook? | MSNBC



Warren taking cues from Obama’s playbook? | MSNBC

Thai junta's gag on media raises alarm, criticism over freedom of speech - Daily Journal

How the US helped create the border crisis The MHP panel takes a closer look at the parallels between the border crisis and its connection to U.S. drug policies.



Melissa Harris-Perry on msnbc

How will US respond to kids at the border? As President Obama meets with Central American leaders, some see the children seeking safety at the U.S. border as a drain on resources. Cristina Jimenez, Yolanda Pierce and Sonia Nazario join to discuss.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Prison (HBO)



Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Prison (HBO) - YouTube

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

Supreme Court caught red handed on Obamacare The Supreme Court may get another big case challenging Obamacare, but we already have a big clue as to why they would rule in favor of the Affordable Care Act.



All In With Chris Hayes 07/24/14
Supreme Court caught red handed on Obamacare
The Supreme Court may get another big case challenging Obamaca

Did a third intifada begin tonight? As the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, thousands of protesters marched from the West Bank to Jerusalem, where they clashed with Israeli security forces. Chris Hayes talks with Dr. Mustafa Barghouti, one of the founders of the Palestinian National Initiative party, and NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin.

All In with Chris Hayes on msnbc: Did a third intifada begin tonight?
As the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, thousands of protesters marched from the West Bank to Jerusalem, where they clashed with Israeli security forces. Chris Hayes talks with Dr. Mustafa Barghouti, one of the founders of the Palestinian National Initiative party, and NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin.

The Invasion of America

New claims of a violent arrest by NYPD | MSNBC



New claims of a violent arrest by NYPD | MSNBC

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The death penalty is cruel and inhuman, and has not been shown in any way to act as a deterrent to crime. The European Union regards abolition as essential for the protection of human dignity, as well as for the progressive development of human rights.

European Union - EEAS (European External Action Service) | EU Policy on Death Penalty

Execution a 'failed experiment': attorney | MSNBC



Execution a 'failed experiment': attorney | MSNBC

Execution a 'failed experiment': attorney | MSNBC



Execution a 'failed experiment': attorney | MSNBC

Prisoner's body ordered preserved as evidence | MSNBC



Prisoner's body ordered preserved as evidence | MSNBC

Witnesses describe two hour ‘gasping’ execution Mauricio Marin, reporter for CBS’s Tucson affiliate KOLD TV, describes the execution of Joseph Wood by the state of Arizona, the latest in a series of botched executions using experimental drugs of undisclosed origin.



The Rachel Maddow Show on msnbc

Air Algerie Jet Chartered by Spain's Swiftair Vanishes in Africa | MSNBC

A commercial jetliner carrying 116 people disappeared over west Africa after losing contact with air traffic controllers early Thursday, a Spanish charter company said.
Air Algerie Flight AH5017 vanished about 50 minutes after it left Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, according to the Algerian Press Service. The jet took off at 1:17 a.m. local time (9:17 p.m. ET on Wednesday) bound for Algiers, Algeria.


Air Algerie Jet Chartered by Spain's Swiftair Vanishes in Africa | MSNBC

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

MSNBC Contributor Accuses Network Of 'Biased' Coverage Toward Israel

"MSNBC contributor Rula Jebreal took issue with the network's coverage of the conflict in the Middle East on Monday.

Speaking on Ronan Farrow's show, she accused MSNBC of covering the Israeli perspective far more than the Palestinian side.

“We are disgustingly biased when it comes to this issue," said Jebreal, an Italian-Palestinian journalist with dual Italian and Israeli citizenship. "Look how [much] air time Netanyahu and his folks have on air on a daily basis — Andrea Mitchell and others. I never see one Palestinian being interviewed on these same issues —"

“I’m going to push back a little on that," Farrow interjected. "We’ve had Palestinian voices on our air.”

“Maybe for 30 seconds, and then you have twenty-five minutes for Bibi Netanyahu, and half an hour for Naftali Bennett," Jebreal countered, referring to Israel's prime minister and minister of the economy, respectively."

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Tariq Abu Khdeir joins for exclusive interview Palestinian-American teen Tariq Abu Khdeir tells Chris Hayes about the moment his cousin disappeared in East Jerusalem before being burned alive in a revenge killing.



All In with Chris Hayes on msnbc

A man dies following a police chokehold Chris Hayes talks to Rev. Al Sharpton about how a procedure banned by NYPD can lead to the death of an unarmed man.







All In with Chris Hayes on msnbc

Marissa Alexander denied new Stand Your Ground hearing | MSNBC

Florida’s controversial Stand Your Ground law will once again be no refuge for Marissa Alexander, the Florida woman who fired what she said was a warning shot near her abusive husband, Rico Gray, and his two sons.
On Friday, Circuit judge James H. Daniel denied her request for a new hearing to seek immunity from prosecution under the law, finding that the legislature’s June revision to include such warning shots ”cannot be applied retroactively” for a new Stand Your Ground hearing. 


Marissa Alexander denied new Stand Your Ground hearing | MSNBC

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Staten Island man dies after NYPD cop puts him in chokehold

Staten Island man dies after NYPD cop puts him in chokehold: A 400-pound asthmatic Staten Island dad died Thursday after a cop put him in a chokehold and other officers appeared to slam his head against the sidewalk, video of the incident shows.

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Immigration Is Changing Much More Than the Immigration Debate | FiveThirtyEight

But while the rhetoric has stayed largely the same, immigration hasn’t. The immigration debate, now as then, focuses primarily on illegal immigration from Latin America. Yet most new immigrants aren’t Latinos. Most Latinos aren’t immigrants. And, based on the best available evidence, there are fewer undocumented immigrants in the U.S. today than there were in 2007. Even the latest immigration crisis — a sudden influx of unaccompanied minors, for which President Barack Obama requested $4 billion in emergency funding to address on Tuesday — represents a break from past patterns: The children are from Central America, not Mexico, and are primarily escaping violence in their home countries, rather than seeking jobs in the U.S.

Immigration Is Changing Much More Than the Immigration Debate | FiveThirtyEight

FORT WORTH, Texas: One woman's journey to and across the US border | Immigration | McClatchy DC

 — Edilsa Cano was fleeing sexual assault, kidnapping and death threats - all from her own family - when she left her village in Guatemala at 16.
Now 21, she sees her own desperation in the tens of thousands of Central American children, some as young as 4, flooding the U.S. border with Mexico. Border authorities are scrambling to shelter the children, and President Barack Obama is looking for ways to deport them faster to cope with what has been called a humanitarian crisis.
Cano said it took her about a month to make the dangerous trip from Central America to the U.S.
Before the 1,000-mile journey was over, she would sleep, six to a bed, with strangers also migrating through Mexico, run away from a violent coyote, or human smuggler, in Arizona and then wander, lost in the desert and looking for help.
"I don't really know how I got here," Cano said in disbelief. "God is with every single child that crosses the border."







Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2014/07/10/232942/one-womans-journey-to-and-across.html#storylink=cpy


FORT WORTH, Texas: One woman's journey to and across the US border | Immigration | McClatchy DC

How One College Handled a Sexual Assault Complaint - NYTimes.com

"In the early-morning hours on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges in central New York, the friend said, he found her — bent over a pool table as a football player appeared to be sexually assaulting her from behind in a darkened dance hall with six or seven people watching and laughing. Some had their cellphones out, apparently taking pictures, he said.

Later, records show, a sexual-assault nurse offered this preliminary assessment: blunt force trauma within the last 24 hours indicating “intercourse with either multiple partners, multiple times or that the intercourse was very forceful.” The student said she could not recall the pool table encounter, but did remember being raped earlier in a fraternity-house bedroom.....

It took the college just 12 days to investigate the rape report, hold a hearing and clear the football players. The football team went on to finish undefeated in its conference, while the woman was left, she said, to face the consequences — threats and harassment for accusing members of the most popular sports team on campus."






How One College Handled a Sexual Assault Complaint - NYTimes.com

Friday, July 04, 2014

Peonage Files of the U.S. Department of Justice, 1901-1945 — Fondren Library - Rice University

Most Americans think chattel slavery in the U. S.  ended in 1865.  They are sadly misinformed and have been purposefully misled. It ended in 1941 after FDR had his Justice Department issue an order ending the peonage system. 
"Microfilm. One of the most striking features of the economy of the South in the early 20th century was the extent to which its farms, plantations, mines, and mills availed themselves of a system of forced labor known as "peonage." This system developed from the practice of holding laborers in debt and forcing them to remain on the premises of their creditors to work off the debt. Peon laborers were thus bound to their masters' firms or plantations, often by means of violence and intimidation. Because the overwhelming majority of peon laborers were black, the system served to entrench racial as well as class divisions throughout the South. In many respects, peonage served as a holdover of the antebellum slave labor system. Here are the complete peonage files of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1901 (when the Justice Department began a massive crackdown on peonage) through 1945. These files include incoming complaints to the department from local U.S. attorneys as well as from private individuals and such civil rights groups as the NAACP. They also detail the Justice Department's response to each complaint and include correspondence between the department and the local prosecutor, internal legal memoranda, depositions of witnesses, briefs, and trial transcripts. Also published in this new collection are the previously restricted Federal Bureau of Investigation case reports, which have never before been available to researchers."

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

New AJC poll shows voters disapprove of Georgia’s new gun law | www.ajc.com


By Kristina Torres

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Georgia voters roundly disapprove of lawmakers’ expansion this year of the state’s gun laws despite being more likely to believe gun ownership helps protect people from becoming victims of a crime, according to a new poll conducted for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The poll, conducted by Abt SRBI of New York, is the first time Georgians have weighed in on the expansion since legislation passed the state Legislature in March and Gov. Nathan Deal signed it in April. The results come only weeks ahead of the May 20 primary election and affirm an AJC poll in January that showed voters strongly opposing what was then one of lawmakers’ signature proposals.

Among respondents in the new poll, 59 percent gave House Bill 60 a thumbs-down. The legislation, which goes into effect July 1, expands the list of places where Georgians may legally carry firearms to include schools, bars, government buildings and, for the first time, churches.

The results come even as 57 percent of Georgia voters said they believe owning a gun helps protect people. Thirty-five percent said gun ownership puts people’s safety at risk. A majority, 55 percent, also said they or someone they live with owns a gun.

The AJC poll surveyed 1,012 adults statewide between May 5 and May 8. The margin of error for each response is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

The full story will be in Saturday’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution and on MyAJC.com later today. More poll results will come out in Sunday’s AJC.