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Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops.


This video clearly demonstrates how racist America is as a country and how far we have to go to become a country that is civilized and actually values equal justice. We must not rest until this goal is achieved. I do not want my great grandchildren to live in a country like we have today. I wish for them to live in a country where differences of race and culture are not ignored but valued as a part of what makes America great.

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

10 Stop And Frisk Comandments

Death Penalty in the USA
Death Penalty Infographic
The Death Penalty in the USA. Produced from ArrestRecords.com

Friday, August 26, 2016

Hillary Clinton Denounces the ‘Alt-Right,’ and the Alt-Right Is Thrilled - The New York Times



Hillary Clinton Denounces the ‘Alt-Right,’ and the Alt-Right Is Thrilled - The New York Times

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Is Donald Trump a Racist? - The New York Times






"One early red flag arose in 1973, when President Richard Nixon’s Justice Department — not exactly the radicals of the day — sued Trump and his father, Fred Trump, for systematically discriminating against blacks in housing rentals.

I’ve waded through 1,021 pages of documents from that legal battle, and they are devastating. Donald Trump was then president of the family real estate firm, and the government amassed overwhelming evidence that the company had a policy of discriminating against blacks, including those serving in the military.

To prove the discrimination, blacks were repeatedly dispatched as testers to Trump apartment buildings to inquire about vacancies, and white testers were sent soon after. Repeatedly, the black person was told that nothing was available, while the white tester was shown apartments for immediate rental.

A former building superintendent working for the Trumps explained that he was told to code any application by a black person with the letter C, for colored, apparently so the office would know to reject it. A Trump rental agent said the Trumps wanted to rent only to “Jews and executives,” and discouraged renting to blacks.

Donald Trump furiously fought the civil rights suit in the courts and the media, but the Trumps eventually settled on terms that were widely regarded as a victory for the government. Three years later, the government sued the Trumps again, for continuing to discriminate.

In fairness, those suits date from long ago, and the discriminatory policies were probably put in place not by Donald Trump but by his father. Fred Trump appears to have been arrested at a Ku Klux Klan rally in 1927; Woody Guthrie, who lived in a Trump property in the 1950s, lambasted Fred Trump in recently discovered papers for stirring racial hatred.

Yet even if Donald Trump inherited his firm’s discriminatory policies, he allied himself decisively in the 1970s housing battle against the civil rights movement." http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/24/opinion/sunday/is-donald-trump-a-racist.html




Is Donald Trump a Racist? - The New York Times

Hillary Clinton goes after Trump's controversial "alt-right" supporters

Clinton ad ties Trump to KKK, white supremacists - POLITICO

All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC




All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Daniel Harris shooting: Family wants answers after trooper kills deaf man - CNN.com

2016-08-22_9-13-34.jpg



"(CNN)Days after his deaf and speech-impaired brother was shot and killed by a North Carolina state trooper, Sam Harris wonders whether the shooting happened because his sibling's disabilities led to a misunderstanding.



No official has said this was the case. But Harris says his family is pressing for more information about why Daniel Kevin Harris was shot near his Charlotte home Thursday after what police say was a roughly 7-mile vehicle chase.

Daniel Harris' relatives told a crowd of dozens gathered for a vigil outside his house Monday night that they want more answers about the 29-year-old's death."



Daniel Harris shooting: Family wants answers after trooper kills deaf man - CNN.com

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Auto Lending: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Affluent and Black, and Still Trapped by Segregation - The New York Times







"In fact, a New York Times analysis of 2014 census figures shows that income alone cannot explain, nor would it likely end, the segregation that has defined American cities and suburbs for generations.

The choices that black families make today are inevitably constrained by a legacy of racism that prevented their ancestors from buying quality housing and then passing down wealth that might have allowed today’s generation to move into more stable communities. And even when black households try to cross color boundaries, they are not always met with open arms: Studies have shown that white people prefer to live in communities where there are fewer black people, regardless of their income.
The result: Nationally, black and white families of similar incomes still live in separate worlds.
In many of America’s largest metropolitan areas, including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, black families making $100,000 or more are more likely to live in poorer neighborhoods than even white households making less than $25,000. This is particularly true in areas with a long history of residential segregation, like metropolitan Milwaukee."




Affluent and Black, and Still Trapped by Segregation - The New York Times

Racist red flags follow Trump Breitbart hire, Steve Bannon | MSNBC



Racist red flags follow Trump Breitbart hire, Steve Bannon | MSNBC

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Does Henry Kissinger Have a Conscience? - The New Yorker

Newly released documents have revealed more about Henry Kissinger’s role in Argentina’s Dirty War.



"Last March, when President Obama travelled to Argentina to meet with the country’s new President, Mauricio Macri, his public appearances were dogged by protesters who noisily demanded explanations, and apologies



"Last March, when President Obama travelled to Argentina to meet with the country’s new President, Mauricio Macri, his public appearances were dogged by protesters who noisily demanded explanations, and apologies, for U.S. policies, past and present. There are few countries in the West where anti-Americanism is as vociferously expressed as in Argentina, where a highly politicized culture of grievance has evolved in which many of the country’s problems are blamed on the United States. On the left, especially, there is lingering resentment over the support extended by the U.S. government to Argentina’s right-wing military, which seized power in March of 1976 and launched a “Dirty War” against leftists that took thousands of lives over the following seven years."





Does Henry Kissinger Have a Conscience? - The New Yorker

Chicago’s predictive policing tool just failed a major test | The Verge

"A RAND report shows that the ‘Strategic Subject List’ doesn’t reduce homicides



Struggling to reduce its high murder rate, the city of Chicago has become an incubator for experimental policing techniques. Community policing, stop and frisk, "interruption" tactics — the city has tried many strategies. Perhaps most controversial and promising has been the city’s futuristic "heat list" — an algorithm-generated list identifying people most likely to be involved in a shooting.



The hope was that the list would allow police to provide social services to people in danger, while also preventing likely shooters from picking up a gun. But a new report from the RAND Corporation shows nothing of the sort has happened. Instead, it indicates that the list is, at best, not even as effective as a most wanted list. At worst, it unnecessarily targets people for police attention, creating a new form of profiling.



Funded through a $2 million grant from the National Institute of Justice, the list’s algorithm identifies people by looking not only at arrests, but also whether someone is socially connected with a known shooter or shooting victim. The program also has a kind of pre-crime feature in which police visit people on the list before any crime has been committed.



One of the list’s most promising aspects was that it wasn’t just a police officer who would visit. Social workers would show up, too — employees of the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy group at John Jay College. The list was designed to let Chicago police engage with at-risk (and potentially dangerous) citizens, but also to provide social services, such as access to counseling, to people who were in danger.



"We want to show them the carrot and the stick," said Christopher Mallette, executive director of the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy group, in a conversation with The Verge last year. "We want them to know they can get help — but we also want them to know that if they don’t keep in line, there’s a jail cell waiting for them."



CPD wasn’t shy about touting the importance of the list, later rebranded as the Strategic Subjects List, or SSL. In 2014, the CPD official in charge of the program, Commander Jonathan Lewin, told The Verge: "This will inform police departments around the country and around the world on how best to utilize predictive policing to solve problems. This is about saving lives."



But the study from RAND, which was granted extraordinary access to CPD when it launched the list in 2013, found that the program has saved no lives at all. The RAND researchers were allowed to view the list, sit in on internal meetings, and generally observe how the tool was being used. They discovered that CPD wasn’t using the list as a way to provide social services; instead, CPD was using it as a way to target people for arrest."



Chicago’s predictive policing tool just failed a major test | The Verge

Friday, August 19, 2016

Police killings of favela residents continue as Games go on in Rio | World news | The Guardian

A woman walks past an armed police patrol in Rio de Janeiro’s Rochina favela community.



"While much of the world’s media has focused on US swimmer Ryan Lochte’s fabricated account of an armed robbery, the real victims of Olympic crime in Rio de Janeiro are the city’s poorest residents, caught on the frontline of conflict between the authorities and drug traffickers.
Since the start of the Olympics, local media have reported at least 14 deaths in shootouts between gang members and police or soldiers from the 85,000-member security force deployed for the Games."
Police killings of favela residents continue as Games go on in Rio | World news | The Guardian

Seminole - The Unconquered (How the west was lost)

John Griffin Black Seminole descendant and Historian.

Forgotten Rebellion: Black Seminoles and the Largest Slave Revolt in U.S...

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Who Will Watch the Watch List? - The New York Times





"New Haven — When a police officer pulled over Peter Santilli last December in Newtown, Ohio, it seemed like a routine traffic stop. But when the officer ran his data in the law enforcement database, Mr. Santilli’s name came up as a match on a terrorist watch list. The cop “pulled out his weapon immediately,” Mr. Santilli said, and told him to put his hands up.



The police later admitted that it was a false match. It’s likely that the match came from a huge, secretive database called the Known or Suspected Terrorist File. The file is linked to the National Crime Information Center database, which law enforcement officers across the country access over 12 million times a day.



Although less known than watch lists like the no-fly list, the K.S.T. contributes to the secret blacklisting and surveillance of hundreds of thousands of individuals. Without due process protections, the file has the potential to ruin innocent people’s lives, while its size dilutes its effectiveness in tracking actual terrorist threats. Moreover, in light of the continuing debate about whether a no-buy list ought to prevent watchlisted people from purchasing guns, it is vital that we re-examine the accuracy and effectiveness of these lists.



In a study of the nation’s growing watch lists, we reviewed more than 13,000 pages of records about the K.S.T., which the American Civil Liberties Union and the Civil Liberties and National Security Clinic at Yale Law School obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. The documents cast light on the rapid growth of the file and its predecessor, the Violent Gangs and Terrorist Organizations File. From about 13,000 entries in 2003, it grew over 2,000 percent in five years — an average of 144 new names being added every day. By 2008, it contained more than 272,000 records. Though the current total is unknown, it’s most likely far larger: In 2013 alone, 468,749 names were submitted to the database, and only 1 percent of those were rejected."



Who Will Watch the Watch List? - The New York Times

Monday, August 15, 2016

When Police Are Poor Role Models for One Another - The New York Times











"The drug trade is so insidious in some neighborhoods of Baltimore that when I was a detective there I sometimes had to arrest children for selling narcotics. Sad as that was, a drug counselor told me, they learned to do it from the people around them.



Police officers learn egregious behavior from those around them, too, I thought, when I read the Department of Justice report issued last Wednesday about the Baltimore Police Department’s systematic abuse of black citizens and violation of their rights.



In one incident mentioned in the report, a Justice Department investigator went on a patrol with a sergeant. The sergeant saw a group of young black men on a street corner and told an officer to order them to leave. The officer said he had no reason to do so. “Make something up,” the sergeant replied.



That the sergeant would do this in front of a federal official investigating civil rights violations may be astounding, but it demonstrated his mind-set. He didn’t think he was doing anything wrong. He must have been in the department for years and had probably been taught to take such action by his field training officer, and even the department’s commanders. It was learned behavior, part of a culture rooted in an “us versus them” mentality."



When Police Are Poor Role Models for One Another - The New York Times