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Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops.


This video clearly demonstrates how racist America is as a country and how far we have to go to become a country that is civilized and actually values equal justice. We must not rest until this goal is achieved. I do not want my great grandchildren to live in a country like we have today. I wish for them to live in a country where differences of race and culture are not ignored but valued as a part of what makes America great.

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

10 Stop And Frisk Comandments

Death Penalty in the USA
Death Penalty Infographic
The Death Penalty in the USA. Produced from ArrestRecords.com

Friday, June 24, 2016

How To Survive A Lynching







"The mob surged forward, some pummeling the jail with sledgehammers while others forced their way through the garage. When they breached the ground-floor walls, they snatched Tommy Shipp first from his cell. Mary Ball’s sister purportedly watched from atop a car, encouraging the mob to wrap a rope around his neck and lynch him. He was already bruised and beaten when they strung him up on the maple tree at the corner of Third and Adams streets outside of the courthouse, diagonal from the jail. Shipp struggled to free the rope from his neck. The mob lowered him, broke both his arms, and pulled.

“I could see the bloodthirsty crowd come to life the moment Tommy’s body was dragged into view.”
Cameron surveyed the gruesome scene from his cell. “I could see the bloodthirsty crowd come to life the moment Tommy’s body was dragged into view,” he recounted in his memoir. “In a matter of seconds, Tommy was a bloody mass and bore no resemblance to any human being. The mob kept beating him just the same. Even after the long, thick rope had been placed around his neck, fists and clubs still mauled him, and sticks and stones continued to pummel his body.”
After the throng returned for Smith, they beat him with crude weapons, and a man impaled him with a pipe. Smith was dead before they tied the noose around his neck. Cameron heard the gleeful cries once the deed was done. Nauseous and drenched in cold sweat, he knew what was next.
“We want Cameron! We want Cameron!” he heard them chant. When a group of white men forced their way onto the second floor, the black men in his cell block made a fruitless attempt to hide and protect him. “Impulsively, I acted like I was going to give myself up when Big John and another Black man grabbed ahold of me and held me back,” he wrote. “They had become too angry to remember their own fear — if they had any. But they were helpless and powerless to offer any kind of resistance to the mob. They stood with me.”
When the mob threatened to lynch another boy, in jail with his father for hitching trains from the South to look for work, the father pointed to Cameron. “The nightmare I had often heard about happening to other victims of a mob now became my reality,” Cameron wrote. “Brutally faced with death, I understood, fully, what it meant to be a black person in the United States of America.”
How To Survive A Lynching

Stand your ground defense denied for Black man in Georgia, Stand your ground has always been for whites only. This is America isn't it?

Jesse Murray (Photo Credit: Provided by family spokesperson Nia Walker)



"Clayton County, Georgia Judge Albert Collier has denied Jessie Murray the use of stand your ground as a defense in his murder trial. Shockingly, the judge stated that the reason Murray could not use the defense was because he said his gun fired by accident during the struggle with the victim and his three friends.



Murray wanted to defend his ex-wife and mother of his children from a group of drunken White men at a bar. Court documents described Murray as being assaulted by the Nathan Adams, a former police officer, and three of his friends. Despite this threat, the court seems to be saying that Murray should have allowed himself to be beaten first and then used his gun as a last resort. In the decision issued by Judge Albert R. Collier, Clayton County Superior Court, the judge felt that Murray was not in fear of his life when he was attacked by a group of four men. The judge stated that “nor does it appear to this court that the other men in the vicinity were acting in such a way that would cause the defendant to reasonably believe that deadly force was necessary to prevent death or great bodily injury to himself or a third party … The court cannot reconcile the defendants asking for immunity under a self-defense statute, by stating that the use of deadly force was justified, and then also stating that the use of deadly force was unintentional.”


Stand your ground defense denied for Black man in Georgia

Thursday, June 23, 2016

A Syllabus In Progress - he ur-text for this reconsideration is W.E.B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction In America. Written in 1935 - The Atlantic

"It would be only fair to the reader to say frankly in advance that the attitude of any person toward this story will be distinctly influenced by his theories of the Negro race. If he believes that the Negro in America and in general is an average and ordinary human being, who under given environment develops like other human beings, then he will read this story and judge it by the facts adduced. If, however, he regards the Negro as a distinctly inferior creation, who can never successfully take part in modern civilization and whose emancipation and enfranchisement were gestures against nature, then he will need something more than the sort of facts that I have set down.



But this latter person, I am not trying to convince. I am simply pointing out these two points of view, so obvious to Americans, and then without further ado, I am assuming the truth of the first. In fine, I am going to tell this story as though Negroes were ordinary human beings, realizing that this attitude will from the first seriously curtail my audience."  WE Dubois



A Syllabus In Progress - The Atlantic

Monday, June 20, 2016

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. Donald Trump makes the Orlando shooting about him. - S03E16 (HBO)

3 N.Y.P.D. Commanders Are Arrested on Corruption Charges - The New York Times





"Three New York Police Department commanders, including a deputy chief, were arrested early Monday, along with a Brooklyn businessman, on federal corruption charges stemming from one of several continuing investigations into Mayor Bill de Blasio’s campaign fund-raising, according to court papers.



The arrests, of a deputy chief, a deputy inspector and a sergeant, were one of the most significant roundups of police supervisors in the recent history of the department. In striking the top ranks, the case is a particular blow to the storied — and sometimes sullied — reputation of the nation’s largest municipal police force."





3 N.Y.P.D. Commanders Are Arrested on Corruption Charges - The New York Times

The Devastating Process of Dying in America Without Insurance | The Nation

Ben Taub Hospital


 "A naturalized citizen from El Salvador, Portillo brought her parents to the United States in 2001 and sponsored their green cards so that she could take care of them as they aged. In late 2013, when Aquilino was diagnosed with end-stage metastatic prostate cancer, she discovered how difficult taking care of him would be.
Portillo’s insurance through her employer—she works nights cleaning offices for the City of Houston—didn’t cover her father, and the family couldn’t afford to buy insurance for him. They tried to determine if he could qualify for Medicare, the federal health benefit for the aging, or Medicaid, the state-run health insurance for the poor, but were given conflicting responses depending on whom they talked to. Confused by the requirements and limited by her poor English, Portillo applied for Medicaid for her father, but never got a response. So, for the better part of a year, the Portillos carted Aquilino back and forth to the emergency room in a wheelchair, where they would wait for hours, sometimes all night, simply to have his pain medications refilled.
As Aquilino’s condition worsened, he could no longer be moved from his bed to see a doctor. His body was riddled with tumors. His legs became too heavy for him to move, and his pain became unbearable. “It was ugly, ugly and scary, to see a loved one dying,” Portillo says in Spanish. “And if that person is your father, it’s something indescribable.”


The Devastating Process of Dying in America Without Insurance | The Nation

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Kenya upholds use of anal exam to determine sexual orientation | World news | The Guardian

Kenyan protesters wear masks during a rally against Uganda’s laws on LGBT rights.



Kenya upholds use of anal exam to determine sexual orientation | World news | The Guardian

Decades Later, Sickness Among Airmen After a Hydrogen Bomb Accident - The New York Times



Decades Later, Sickness Among Airmen After a Hydrogen Bomb Accident - The New York Times

Black Americans incarcerated five times more than white people – report | US news | The Guardian

Hands clench bars.



“You can’t work in the justice system and not know just by looking that there are racial disparities in the system,” said Baz Dreisinger, the creator of the Prison-to-College Pipeline program which prepares New York inmates in state prison for higher education.

“Every year we maybe have one white student in our class,” Dreisinger said. “Obviously race is not remotely an admissions factor for us, but it’s just the reality of what it is.”
report published on Tuesday sought to put data behind that reality by analyzing race within state prisons and comparing those findings to the US census.
Black Americans were incarcerated in state prisons at an average rate of 5.1 times that of white Americans, the report said, and in some states that rate was 10 times or more. The US is 63.7% non-Hispanic white, 12.2% black, 8.7% Hispanic white and 0.4% Hispanic black, according to the most recent census.
The research was conducted by Ashley Nellis, a senior research analyst with the Sentencing Project, a Washington, DC-based nonprofit that promotes reforms in criminal justice policy and advocates for alternatives to incarceration.
Nellis found that in five states, the disparity rate was more than double the average. New Jersey had the highest, with a ratio of 12.2 black people to one white person in its prison system, followed by Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and Vermont.
Overall, Oklahoma had the highest rate of black people incarcerated with 2,625 black inmates people per 100,000 residents. Oklahoma is 7.7% black."


Black Americans incarcerated five times more than white people – report | US news | The Guardian

Thousands protest at US bases on Okinawa after Japanese woman's murder | World news | The Guardian

People stage a rally in Okinawa over American military presence in Japan.



"Thousands of people gathered on the Japanese island of Okinawa on Sunday in one of the biggest demonstrations in two decades against US military bases following the arrest of an American suspected of murdering a local woman.

The protest marks a new low for the United States and Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe in their relations with the island and threatens plans to have the US marines’ Futenma air station moved to a less populous part of the island.


Thousands protest at US bases on Okinawa after Japanese woman's murder | World news | The Guardian

‘Always Agitated. Always Mad’: Omar Mateen, According to Those Who Knew Him - The New York Times

"Omar Mateen was a disciplinary challenge in school, unafraid to push buttons. “Constantly moving, verbally abusive, rude, aggressive,” that school assessment noted. In the third grade, his rendition of the school song at Mariposa Elementary replaced “Mariposa, Mariposa” with “marijuana, marijuana.”

The boy was formally disciplined more than 30 times in elementary and middle schools as he pursued attention and occasional conflict rather than his studies. His father would later say that young Omar preferred drawing pictures in class to listening, which seems borne out by an assessment one of his teachers wrote at the time:

“Unfortunately, Omar had great difficulty focusing on his classwork since he often seeks the attention of his classmates through some sort of noise, disruption, or distraction.”

So was Omar Mateen betraying his latent extremist sympathies — or was he just being tone-deaf — when, at 14, he shocked other students on his school bus by imitating an exploding plane so soon after the Sept. 11 attacks?

“He got on, walked up the first couple of steps, held his arms out and made sounds like a motor and then made an explosion sound — and slipped into his seat,” Robert Zirkle, another student on the bus, remembered. “He did this three or four times, and was clearly not in the mood or the same state of mind that we were in. He seemed excited.”

His unsettling pantomimes ended when others told him there would be problems if he continued.

Omar cycled through three high schools, collecting a string of suspensions — for fighting and other infractions — along the way. (In one case, a charge of battery was adjudicated and a charge of disturbing school function was dropped, he later wrote to a potential employer. “This was an experience of me growing up and I learned a big lesson from it.”)

Martin Bielicki, a former dean of students at Martin County High School, remembered in an email that this student “had issues with other students, in particular,” and “always would argue back and even defend himself.”

“I remember Omar as a 14-year-old boy,” Mr. Bielicki wrote. “I look at that yearbook picture of him and it brings back memories of an innocent and likable young man.”

Omar matured with time. He took up soccer and skateboarding, became infatuated with weight lifting, and shed the flabbiness that had become a source of ridicule."

‘Always Agitated. Always Mad’: Omar Mateen, According to Those Who Knew Him - The New York Times

NYTimes: A Glimpse of Omar Mateen's Past, From School Reports to Job Dismissal

"Omar Mateen was born in Queens in 1986 to Afghan parents. He moved to Florida with his family in 1991 and spent his early years in the Port St. Lucie area on the state’s east coast. In both elementary and middle school, his teachers described him as often being unable to focus or control himself in class. As a young man, Mr. Mateen became interested in a career in law enforcement andearned an associate degree in criminal justice technology from Indian River State College in 2006.

As investigators comb through his past to glean an understanding of the young man whose attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando killed 49 people and wounded 53 others, a portrait of a complicated childhood and young adulthood is emerging. These documents offer a glimpse into Mr. Mateen’s life. "

NYTimes: A Glimpse of Omar Mateen's Past, From School Reports to Job Dismissal

Friday, June 17, 2016

So You Think You Know the Second Amendment? - The New Yorker. I have been teaching this to Constitutional Law classes for a dozen years.

"For more than a hundred years, the answer was clear, even if the words of the amendment itself were not. The text of the amendment is divided into two clauses and is, as a whole, ungrammatical: “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” The courts had found that the first part, the “militia clause,” trumped the second part, the “bear arms” clause. In other words, according to the Supreme Court, and the lower courts as well, the amendment conferred on state militias a right to bear arms—but did not give individuals a right to own or carry a weapon."



So You Think You Know the Second Amendment? - The New Yorker