Contact Me By Email


Atlanta, GA Weather from Weather Underground

Today's News

Loading...

Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops.


This video clearly demonstrates how racist America is as a country and how far we have to go to become a country that is civilized and actually values equal justice. We must not rest until this goal is achieved. I do not want my great grandchildren to live in a country like we have today. I wish for them to live in a country where differences of race and culture are not ignored but valued as a part of what makes America great.

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

What To Do When You're Stopped By Police - The ACLU & Elon James White

10 Stop And Frisk Comandments

Death Penalty in the USA
Death Penalty Infographic
The Death Penalty in the USA. Produced from ArrestRecords.com

Monday, July 28, 2014

Georgia's deadly prisons | Cover Story | Creative Loafing Atlanta

On April 29, 2013, around 4:16 p.m., correctional officers entered Detravia Bryant's cell at Ware State Prison, a maximum-security facility just outside Waycross, a South Georgia town a short drive from the Okefenokee Swamp.
There they discovered the 29-year-old west Atlanta native lying on the floor. According to the handwritten incident report, the convicted murderer was not breathing and had no pulse. Quinten Mallery, his cellmate, was placed in restraints and taken to the showers. After staff attempted CPR, Bryant was transported by ambulance to a hospital in Waycross. One hour after prison staff first responded to Bryant's cell, he was pronounced dead.
Corrections officials categorized Bryant's death as a suicide, family members say. It would have been unlike Bryant to take his own life, says his great uncle James Jackson.


Georgia's deadly prisons | Cover Story | Creative Loafing Atlanta

Sunday, July 27, 2014

The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization - NYTimes.com

It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.
The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.
We reached that conclusion after a great deal of discussion among the members of The Times’s Editorial Board, inspired by a rapidly growing movement among the states to reform marijuana laws.
There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use. But neither are there such answers about tobacco or alcohol, and we believe that on every level — health effects, the impact on society and law-and-order issues — the balance falls squarely on the side of national legalization. That will put decisions on whether to allow recreational or medicinal production and use where it belongs — at the state level.
We considered whether it would be best for Washington to hold back while the states continued experimenting with legalizing medicinal uses of marijuana, reducing penalties, or even simply legalizing all use. Nearly three-quarters of the states have done one of these.
But that would leave their citizens vulnerable to the whims of whoever happens to be in the White House and chooses to enforce or not enforce the federal law.
The social costs of the marijuana laws are vast. There were 658,000 arrests for marijuana possession in 2012, according to F.B.I. figures, compared with 256,000 for cocaine, heroin and their derivatives. Even worse, the result is racist, falling disproportionately on young black men, ruining their lives and creating new generations of career criminals.
There is honest debate among scientists about the health effects of marijuana, but we believe that the evidence is overwhelming that addiction and dependence are relatively minor problems, especially compared with alcohol and tobacco. Moderate use of marijuana does not appear to pose a risk for otherwise healthy adults. Claims that marijuana is a gateway to more dangerous drugs are as fanciful as the “Reefer Madness” images of murder, rape and suicide.
There are legitimate concerns about marijuana on the development of adolescent brains. For that reason, we advocate the prohibition of sales to people under 21.
Creating systems for regulating manufacture, sale and marketing will be complex. But those problems are solvable, and would have long been dealt with had we as a nation not clung to the decision to make marijuana production and use a federal crime.
In coming days, we will publish articles by members of the Editorial Board and supplementary material that will examine these questions. We invite readers to offer their ideas, and we will report back on their responses, pro and con.
We recognize that this Congress is as unlikely to take action on marijuana as it has been on other big issues. But it is long past time to repeal this version of Prohibition.


The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization - NYTimes.com

Saturday, July 26, 2014

NYC Approves Apartment Building With Separate Entrance for Poor People

"It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City's income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.

Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex's 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance."

Warren taking cues from Obama’s playbook? | MSNBC



Warren taking cues from Obama’s playbook? | MSNBC

Thai junta's gag on media raises alarm, criticism over freedom of speech - Daily Journal

How the US helped create the border crisis The MHP panel takes a closer look at the parallels between the border crisis and its connection to U.S. drug policies.



Melissa Harris-Perry on msnbc

How will US respond to kids at the border? As President Obama meets with Central American leaders, some see the children seeking safety at the U.S. border as a drain on resources. Cristina Jimenez, Yolanda Pierce and Sonia Nazario join to discuss.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Prison (HBO)



Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Prison (HBO) - YouTube

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

The Affordable Care Act was always big. It was always complicated. It was always inelegant. But it was always meant to be universal, reaching all Americans regardless of their income or political tendencies or hometown. Yet over the past two years, the law has splintered and that goal has been dashed, at least for now. And the greatest risk posed to the A.C.A. by the court decision in Halbig v. Burwell, released this week, is that the law might splinter further.



The Worst-Case Scenario for Obamacare -- NYMag

Supreme Court caught red handed on Obamacare The Supreme Court may get another big case challenging Obamacare, but we already have a big clue as to why they would rule in favor of the Affordable Care Act.



All In With Chris Hayes 07/24/14
Supreme Court caught red handed on Obamacare
The Supreme Court may get another big case challenging Obamaca

Did a third intifada begin tonight? As the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, thousands of protesters marched from the West Bank to Jerusalem, where they clashed with Israeli security forces. Chris Hayes talks with Dr. Mustafa Barghouti, one of the founders of the Palestinian National Initiative party, and NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin.

All In with Chris Hayes on msnbc: Did a third intifada begin tonight?
As the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, thousands of protesters marched from the West Bank to Jerusalem, where they clashed with Israeli security forces. Chris Hayes talks with Dr. Mustafa Barghouti, one of the founders of the Palestinian National Initiative party, and NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin.

The Invasion of America

New claims of a violent arrest by NYPD | MSNBC



New claims of a violent arrest by NYPD | MSNBC